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Engine preparation for winter

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Foghorn View Drop Down
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    Posted: 25 September 2002 at 8:14pm

Sad to say, but in these northern climes I'm sure many of you have noticed the nights are getting cooler...this can only mean that winter is sneaking up on us.

Perhaps you've even been notified of your haul-out date and you have already started running through the check list of things to do for the winter. Certainly one of the important parts of that process is the preparation of the Bukh engine for its hibernation.

Here's a couple of tips you might want to use, if you're not already doing so, in getting your engine ready. As always, if anyone feels they have a better method by all means chime in here.

  • Get the engine up operating temperature, let it then cool a bit and proceed to change the oil. From memory it takes about 1.3 litres of oil to fill after a change. Don't overfill it!
  • Once full of new oil, bring the engine back up to normal operating temperature. This may take some time to do when the outside temps are cool. A diesel will not reach temperature by just idling, you must put the engine under load more likely by going out for a spin.
  • Assuming this is your last run with engine and it will now be winterised, you'll want to have anti-freeze on hand. Be sure that the engine is hot and that the thermostat is fully open - how can you do that you ask? By feeling with your hand around the thermostat housing on the top (facing aft) of the cylinder head. You'll want to make sure this is the same temperature as the rest of the engine and be quite warn to the touch but not enough to burn you.
  • Use plumbers anti-freeze to winterise the engine as it is more environmentaly friendly than glycol. Be sure to check the freezing temperature rating.
  • Next, either with the engine running or starting just after, take the cover off the water intake strainer and prepare to pour in anti-freeze, close the valve on the through hull fitting for the water intake.
  • With the valve closed and the engine running, pour anti-freeze into the strainer to maintain a sufficient level. Run the engine until pure anti-freeze is ejected from the exhaust, once this is acheived - turn off the engine.
  • Your Bukh should be ready for many cold days ahead.

The critical aspect of this proceedure is to ensure the thermostat is open before filling with anti-freeze. This is the only way to ensure sufficient protection in the thermostat housing and possibly the head against freezing and cracking.

I hope this helps and if someone would like to add more to this that's great.

Cheers,

Paul White
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 September 2002 at 3:49pm

Paul,

Sailing's just started here on the wet coast. We are in the salty stuff so freezing and consequential head cracking is not an issue, however starting in the cold stuff can be a challenge. My most current technique is a blow torch in the inlet with the air filter removed, this in combination with decompressing the engine to get the revs up usually works. What do others do?

BTW DON"T use ether (quikstart) as this will blow the head gasket. Don't ask how I know.

 

 

 

 

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Foghorn Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 September 2002 at 4:09pm

Chris,

LOL..."sailing's just started here on the wet coast."  Too true...but beautiful country.

So you have an 'alergy' to ether do you? We'll have to remember that. I guess you've toned things down a little and just use a blow torch now  .

No doubt in cooler climes I can see having to use the decompression lever, as you say you need to get the rpms up to start it. You might try a hair dryer on the intake if you need to (sounds safer...lol) and don't forget that little rubber plug on the head where you can put a couple of drops of oil into to lube the cylinder and give you more compression.

Cheers,

Paul White
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 September 2002 at 8:07pm
Paul: My water strainer must be different because intake and outlet hoses are both attached to the cover.   Alternative technique is 1) CLOSE inlet stopcock; 2) Loosen hose clamp & remove hose from fitting; 3) Place hose in 4 litre jug of antifreeze; 4) Restart previously warmed engine; 5) Run on deck to watch outlet for colour change; 6) Stop engine before jug is empty.  Happy skiing everyone
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 September 2002 at 1:57am

This will be my first winter with Impact. What else should be on the winterize list?

-antifreeze in engine.

-full fuel tank to minimize condensation.

-antifreeze in head or disassemble pump? (empty holding tank)

-battery fully charged and stored off the boat indoors

-empty beer cans to recycling

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 October 2002 at 12:55pm
The Bukh manual recommends to change the engine oil so that it is stored with clean oil as described by Foghorn.  You can also open the plug and put a few drops of oil in the cylinder head before turning it over a couple of times. I generally open the top of the water pump, remove the rubber impellor, coat it with vaseline and and either leave it out till spring or remove the antifreeze from the impellor chamber.  It is however important to leave yourself a note as a reminder to replace the impellor. Depending of how much space you have to store stuff at home you might want to removthe the soft lockers and cushions.   I usually lift the floor boards and remove the lifelines before covering the boat with a tarp.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote WarBird Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 August 2010 at 10:07am
I use a short length of 1/2 or 5/8 garden hose with a male coupler on one end. When the engine is up to temperature, I disconnect the water strainer outlet and stick the garden hose in (coupler end) to engine water inlet. Other end of hose is in a gallon jug of antifreeze. When pure antifreeze comes out exhaust, I shut the engine down. This process is neat, and clean. The water strainer gets dumped and inspected at this time for junk etc.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Winner Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 May 2012 at 12:44pm
Hi all,

I just want to confirm the required amount of engine and saildrive oil when changing.  The manual states 2.0 litres of engine oil however Paul above listed 1.3 litres.  Thats a big difference!

Also, 0.4 litres of saildrive oil?

And finally, from my reading in this forum I gather that pumping the oil out is preferred over the drain plug so you can remove a greater quantity since the plug is not at the very bottom?

Thanks
Chris
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Bill Layton Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 May 2012 at 1:19pm
saildrive is 1/2 litre

motor oil is to full mark on dip stick.....do not overfill and do not underfill. crankcase is very small. Also do not motorsail as engine does not like to run when heeled. When this happens you usually find oil all over the engine compartment
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Winner Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 September 2012 at 11:55pm
Hi all,

For winterizing the engine, can one use plumber's antifreeze which is safer for the environment or does it need to be ethylene glycol?  At the local store today, the bottles of plumber's antifreeze all have on the label "not to be used in internal combustion engines" however I think they are referring to it's use as an engine coolant, not for winterizing.

Then again I've also read that ethylene glycol has rust inhibitors etc...

Also, straight antifreeze or mix it with with a bit of water (3:1 for example)?

So confusing... and it's only antifreeze!


Edited by Winner - 16 September 2012 at 11:57pm
Chris
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Bill Layton Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 September 2012 at 8:31am
I use the 9.5 litre size container of plumbers antifreeze and run it all thru. I've done it for years now without problem. Do not dilute it.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Seawolf Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 September 2012 at 3:25pm

I notice that no has mention to open the drain plug located on the cylinder. I did, I wanted to be sure that the antifreeze made it to the cylinder. It did, but now I am having a bugger of a time getting the little lock nut to thread back onto the plug. I suppose an easier way to drain, would be to pull the feeder hose from the bottom of the cylinder head located on the Starboard side, I am thinking this should drain the cylinder head, the cylinder and you can check for rust accumulation at the same time. I did this not so much on whether to drain or not, (Seems like the consensus is not to drain to inhibit rust) but just to be sure that the antifreeze made it through the system.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Bill Layton Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 September 2012 at 3:30pm
If you put the large 9.5 litre container thru the engine you can be assured it got thru. I also do this once the engine has been warmed up for 20 minutes so that the thermostat is open. Yes about the rust when draining. The rust particles get caught in the head and eventually cause blockage with over heating and head warpage. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bal149 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 September 2012 at 8:19pm
use a 14 mm ratcheting box end wrench to tighten the bolt. Good luck.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Winner Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 September 2012 at 9:08pm
Is it sufficient to warm the engine at idle or does it need to be under load to get the thermostat to open?
Chris
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Bill Layton Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 September 2012 at 9:28pm
I run it at 50% throttle in neutral, consider that a semi load. After 20 minutes the engine is hot. I've done it this way since my boat was new and never had a problem.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mad Max Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 September 2012 at 9:08am
Rather than free wheel the engine I prefer to put it in gear at the dock so the engine is running under load.  Make sure your dock lines are in good shape.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Winner Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 September 2012 at 2:51pm
Yes that's what I'd read too in Nigel Calder's diesel engine book - idling the engine isn't enough.  He suggested running it under load at the dock (or out on the water obviously).  Mind you if Bill has been doing it his way for 20+ years and hasn't had a problem I think that's fine to do as well.  
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Winner Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 July 2016 at 2:10pm
Originally posted by Bill Layton Bill Layton wrote:

saildrive is 1/2 litre

motor oil is to full mark on dip stick.....do not overfill and do not underfill. crankcase is very small. Also do not motorsail as engine does not like to run when heeled. When this happens you usually find oil all over the engine compartment

Two questions then:

1) Why/how does oil get all over the engine compartment?  Does it come out of the vent of the filler cap?

2) How much heel is acceptable? Presumable if motorsailing then the winds are light and you wouldn't be heeled more than 5 degrees or so, 10 at most. Is this OK?
Chris
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Bill Layton Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 July 2016 at 3:23pm
Yes it sprays out of the oil fill cap. No heel is acceptable. My experience is that any heel can empty the crankcase of oil. Some engines seem to have better baffling than others it's not an early engine versus a later one, some of them are really bad. I've seen many engines empty of oil because of this. This engine only holds a litre of oil. This leaves no room for error. When we built these boats we told customers not to motorsail it for that reason. However we didn't learn about it until all literature was published so it's not on paper or in the Laser manual that came with the boat. 
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